Joomla vs WordPress

If you’re after a new Website Design for your Cairns or Sunshine Coast business, you’ve come to the right place.  There are two main options to consider before embarking on a new website, whether you need a Static or a Dynamic Website.

A Static Website contains web pages with fixed content. Each page is coded in HTML and displays the same information to every visitor. Static sites are the most basic type of website and are the easiest to create.

A Dynamic Website contains information that changes, depending on the viewer of the site, the time of the day, the time zone, the native language of the country the viewer is in or many other factors.  A dynamic web site can contain client-side scripting or server-side scripting to generate the changing content, or a combination of both scripting types. These sites also include HTML programming for the basic structure. The client-side or server-side scripting takes care of the guts of the site.  A Dynamic Site usually includes a CMS (Content Management System) enabling you to log into the back-end of your website and manage the content yourself.  You can upload images, write articles, send newsletters or add and remove web pages yourself, without having to employ the services of a Website Designer / Developer.

Here are the main differences between two of the most popular CMS solutions,

Joomla vs WordPress

Joomla Website Design Sunshine Coast

Joomla: Pros and Cons

Joomla is an open-source content management software forked from Mambo. It is one of the most popular CMS solutions in the world and boasts over 30m downloads to date. Joomla powers such noteworthy sites as Cloud.com, Linux.com, etc.

Advantages of Joomla

  • User-Friendly: Joomla is still relatively easy to use. Those new to publishing will find its UI polished, flexible and powerful, although there is still a slight learning curve involved in figuring everything out.
  • Strong Developer Community: Like WordPress, Joomla has a strong developer community. The plugin library (called ‘extensions’ in Joomla) is large with a ton of free to use, open source plugins.
  • Extension Variability: Joomla extensions are divided into five categories – components, plugins, templates, modules and languages. Each of these differs in function, power and capability. Components, for example, work as ‘mini-apps’ that can change the Joomla installation altogether. Modules, on the other hand, add minor capabilities like dynamic content, RSS feeds, and search function to a web page.
  • Strong Content Management Capabilities: Unlike WordPress, Joomla was originally designed as an enterprise-grade CMS. This makes it far more capable at handling a large volume of articles than WordPress.

Disadvantages of Joomla

  • Some Learning Involved: You can’t jump right into a Joomla installation and start hammering out new posts if you’re not familiar with the software. The learning curve isn’t steep, but it can be enough to intimidate casual users.
  • Lacks SEO Capabilities: Making WordPress SEO friendly is as easy as installing a free plugin. With Joomla, you’ll need a ton of work to get to the same level of search engine friendliness. Unless you have the budget to hire a SEO expert, you might want to look at alternative solutions.
  • Limited ACL Support: ACL (Access Control List) refers to a list of permissions that can be granted to specific users for specific pages. ACL is a vital component of any enterprise-grade CMS solution. Joomla started supporting ACL only after version 1.6. ACL support is still limited in the stable v2.5.1 release, making it unsuitable for enterprise customers.

Recommended Use

Joomla enables you to build a site with more structural stability and content than WordPress, and has a fairly intuitive interface. If you want a standard website with standard capabilities – a blog, a static/dynamic front-end, a forum, etc. then use Joomla. Joomla is also a good option for small to mid-tier e-commerce stores. If you want something more powerful for enterprise use, consider Drupal.

Wordpress Website Design Sunshine Coast

WordPress: Pros and Cons

More than 68 million websites use WordPress, making it the world’s favorite blogging software. It is flexible enough to power fortune 500 company blogs as well as sporadically updated personal journals.

Below, we take a look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of using WordPress:

Advantages of WordPress

  • Multiple Authors: WordPress was built from the ground-up to accommodate multiple authors – a crucial feature for any serious publication.
  • Huge Plugin Library: WordPress’ is the poster-child of the open-source developer community, which has developed hundreds of thousands of plugins for it. There are few things WordPress can’t do with its extensive library of plugins.
  • User-Friendly: WordPress’ UI is easy to use and highly intuitive, even for first-time bloggers. You can drop a theme, add a few plugins, and start blogging within minutes.
  • Strong SEO Capabilities: With plugins like All in One SEO, you can start blogging straight away without worrying about on-page SEO.
  • Easy Customization: WordPress’ theming system is designed for easy-customization. Anyone with a little grasp of HTML and CSS can customize WordPress themes to fit his/her needs.
  • Flexibility: WordPress can be made to do virtually anything – run an e-commerce store, host a video site, serve as a portfolio or work as a company blog – thanks to plugins and customized themes.

 Disadvantages of WordPress

  • Security: As the category leading software with millions of installations, WordPress is often the target of hackers. The software itself isn’t very secure out of the box and you will have to install third-party plugins to boost your WordPress installation’s security.
  • Incompatibility with Older Plugins: The WordPress team constantly releases new updates to fix security loopholes and patch problems. These updates are often incompatible with older plugins. If your site relies on older plugins, you may have to hold off on updating (which makes your site all the more susceptible to hack attacks).
  • Limited Design Options: Even though WordPress is infinitely customizable, most WordPress installations still look like WordPress installations. Although recent updates and improvements in plugins/themes have rectified this problem somewhat, WordPress is still hampered by limited design options.
  • Limited Content Management Capabilities: WordPress was originally designed as a blogging platform. This has affected its ability to handle large amounts of content. If you plan to publish hundreds of blog posts per week (not uncommon for large publishers), you may find the default WordPress backend a little underwhelming for such high content volume.

Recommended Use

WordPress is often called a ‘mini CMS’. It isn’t nearly as powerful or capable as Drupal or Joomla, but is easy enough for any lay user. Use WordPress if you want a simple, easy to use blogging solution that looks good and can accommodate multiple authors easily.

FYI: Logomotion is a WordPress based website.

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